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How long term home working will affect your finances

Archive for the ‘Tax planning’ Category

How long term home working will affect your finances

Wednesday, October 14th, 2020

There’s a chance that many workplaces may never return to office. Several prominent tech firms have already said that their staff can continue to work from home even after the pandemic and the evidence suggests that a large number of other employers are thinking the same thing.

Essentially, the pandemic accelerated an already established shift in the way we work, so that a few years worth of changes happened overnight.

The Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development recently conducted a survey and found that the proportion of people working regularly from home has risen to 37%, more than double the number from before the pandemic.

What’s more, employers think that the proportion of staff who work permanently from home full time will rise to 22% post-pandemic. In those pre-pandemic, halcyon days, this figure was 9%.

This shift will have financial implications for those home-working. And, as usual, the good comes with the bad. Here are some things you should consider:

It might affect your insurance costs

Back in March, the sudden change to home working will have been unexpected and you might have overlooked the impact it could have on your insurance. However, now the dust is settling, you should mention it to your home insurer. 

Chances are your home will have an extra printer, laptop and tablet, valuables that should be covered by your home insurance policy. Remember that if this kit belongs to your employer, their insurance should protect it. It’s worth double checking before you add anything to your policy.

Lastly, if you’re working from home permanently and no longer using your car to commute, tell your insurer. You may be able to pay less on your premiums.

You can claim tax relief on expenses

On 6 April, Rishi Sunak raised the claim allowance to £6 a week to cover extra household bills caused by working at home. 

When there is a home working arrangement in place, an employer can pay a weekly amount to its employees tax free. If you think that your costs exceed this amount, you should check with your employer to see if they will make higher contributions.

This benefit will only be available if your employer specifically asked you to work from home. If you’re working from home voluntarily, you cannot claim this tax relief on your bills.

It might be harder to secure a pay rise

By now, it’s widely established that working from home needn’t have an adverse effect on the quality of your work. However, there’s still quite a lot of uncertainty around the effects of homeworking on employees’ ability to secure promotions and pay increases.

When working remotely, it can be hard to keep relationships with people in your firm. There’s also a chance that employees who work from home permanently in a company where some staff still work from the office could get sidelined when promotions come up.

Showing the value of your efforts can be more difficult. It seems like good communication is important to avoid being overlooked. Try to communicate any new skills you have learnt and consistently show how your personal development is supporting you to do your job effectively at home.

If you’d like to know more about how your career choices affect your financial future, please get in touch. We’d be more than happy to help.

The Chancellor’s Winter Economic Plan

Thursday, October 1st, 2020

In December 2019, the Conservatives won an 80 seat majority in the General Election and three months later, new Chancellor Rishi Sunak presented his first Budget. But by then there was a large cloud on the horizon – the outbreak of Covid-19. 

The Chancellor used his Budget speech in March to present a raft of measures to support businesses and jobs, promising to do “whatever it takes.” A week later he was back with more emergency measures and on Monday 23rd March, the UK went into full lockdown. 

Six months on from lockdown, the Treasury announced that the Chancellor’s traditional Budget speech had been cancelled for this year and instead he would present a Winter Economic Plan on Thursday 24th September.  

What has happened in the last six months? 

The last six months for the UK economy can perhaps be summarised in two words: ‘recession’ and ‘redundancies’. Figures released for the second quarter of the year – April to June – showed that the UK economy had shrunk by 20.4%. Early hopes of a ‘V-shaped recovery’ from the downturn quickly vanished.

The pandemic has unquestionably accelerated trends that may otherwise have taken 20 or 30 years to arrive. We may well all have been working from home by 2050 but this week, the Prime Minister told office workers to do it for perhaps the next six months. That will surely have serious consequences for many town centres and the ‘commuter economy’. 

These changes have, inevitably, meant widespread redundancies. Figures recently released suggest that UK payrolls shrank by 695,000 in August as the Chancellor’s furlough scheme started to wind down. 

The Chancellor’s Speech 

The Chancellor, Rishi Sunak, was at pains to stress that he’d consulted both sides of industry on the measures he was going to introduce. He was photographed before the speech with Carolyn Fairbairn of the CBI, and Frances O’Grady of the TUC. 

He rose to his feet in a suitably socially-distanced House of Commons and stated that his aim was to protect jobs and the economy as winter approached, and to try and “strike a balance between the virus and the economy.” We were, he said, “in a fundamentally different position to March.” 

Rishi Sunak said that the UK had enjoyed “three months of growth” and that “millions of people” had come off the furlough scheme and returned to work. While ‘three months of growth’ is undoubtedly true, we must remember that the economy shrank by 20.4% in the second quarter. According to the Office for National Statistics, the economy grew by 6.6% in July – but it has only recovered just over half the activity lost because of the pandemic. 

The primary goal, the Chancellor stated, was “nurturing jobs through the winter” as we all faced up to the “new normal.” He conceded, though, that not all jobs could be protected and that people could not be kept in jobs that “only exist in furlough.” 

So what measures did the Chancellor propose? 

Emphasising that he could not protect “every business and every job” the Chancellor conceded that businesses faced uncertainty and reduced demand. In a bid to protect jobs through this period, the first measure he introduced was: 

The Job Support Scheme

  • This is a six month scheme, starting on 1st November 2020
  • To be eligible, employees must work a minimum of 33% of their normal hours 
  • For remaining hours not worked, the Government and the employer will each pay one third of the employee’s wages 
  • This means employees working at least 33% of their hours will receive at least 77% of their pay 
  • The Chancellor also announced that he was extending the support scheme for the self-employed on “similar terms” to the Job Support Scheme 

Pay as you Grow 

After ‘eat out to help out’, we now have the Chancellor’s next catchy slogan: pay as you grow. 

  • Businesses which took loans guaranteed by the Government during the crisis will now be able to extend those loans from six years to ten years, “nearly halving the average monthly repayment,” said the Chancellor. 
  • There is also the option to move to interest only payments, or to suspend payments for six months if the business “is in real trouble,” with no impact on the business’s credit rating. 
  • Coronavirus Business Interruption Loans (CBILS), taken out by a reported 60,000 SMEs, can now also be extended to 10 years.
  • The Chancellor also promised a new government-backed loan scheme, to be introduced in January.

VAT Deferral 

  • Businesses who deferred their VAT during the crisis will no longer have to pay a lump sum at the end of March next year. 
  • They will have the option of splitting it into smaller, interest free payments during the 2021-2022 financial year. “This will benefit up to half a million businesses,” claimed the Chancellor. 

Income tax is deferred – but it still needs to be paid 

As we all know, death and taxes are inevitable. The Chancellor did at least delay one of them for many people…

  • He announced extra support to allow people to delay their income tax bill, which should benefit millions of the self-employed. 
  • Those with a debt of up to £30,000 will be able to go online and set up a repayment plan to January 2022.
  • Those with a debt over £30,000 should contact HMRC and set up a plan over the phone. 

The planned VAT increase is postponed 

  • The Chancellor’s final move was to give direct, targeted help to the tourism and hospitality sectors. 
  • These two sectors had benefitted from a lower VAT rate of 5%. This lower rate was due to end in January, but will now remain in force until 31st March 2021. 

What was the reaction to the speech? 

As with all Budget speeches, the reaction was mixed. Carolyn Fairbairn of the CBI praised the Chancellor for “bold steps which will save hundreds of thousands of viable jobs this winter.” 

Manufacturing group Make UK said the Chancellor ‘deserved credit’ for looking at action taken in other countries such as Germany and France and copying their successful ideas. 

The Adam Smith Institute was more cautious: the Chancellor’s plans were “sensible – but not costless.” Matthew Lesh, head of research at the free-market think tank said, “The Government must resist becoming addicted to spending. Temporary spending is sensible to keep struggling businesses afloat, but in the longer run we are going to have to get the national accounts in order.” 

There was, though, plenty of criticism, especially from the retail sector. Lord Wolfson, boss of Next, warned that ‘hundreds of thousands’ of retail jobs may now become ‘unviable’ in the wake of the crisis. “I wouldn’t want to underestimate the difficulty,” he said, “I think it is going to be very uncomfortable.” 

Where do we go from here? 

As we have commented above, six months, roughly to the end of March, now seems to be the accepted next phase of the fight against the pandemic. As people worry about whether they’ll be able to see their families over Christmas, many will also be worrying about their jobs.

In his speech, the Chancellor more than once stressed that he could not save ‘every job and every business’ and a sharp rise in unemployment through the winter seems inevitable, which will lead to more Government spending on benefits and lower tax receipts. 

The Treasury is already facing a significant shortfall and the Winter Economic Plan, although the level of Government support has been sharply scaled back, will only add to that. At some point, all the support will need to be paid for, either by increased taxes or more optimistically, a resurgent economy. 

What does this mean for my savings and investments? 

Many world stock markets have proved remarkably resilient to the pandemic and are showing gains this year. Unfortunately, the UK’s FTSE-100 index is not one of them: it ended 2019 at 7,542 and closed March as the country went into lockdown at 5,672. As we write this commentary (Friday morning), it is standing at 5,823, up 2.66% on the end of March. 

As we have stressed many times, saving and investing is a long-term commitment and, while there will undoubtedly be plenty of bumps in the road ahead, Governments and central banks around the world remain committed to an eventual economic recovery. Yes, the pandemic has accelerated trends and certain sectors of both the UK and world economies have suffered serious damage; but as we never tire of saying, new companies will find new ways to bring new products to new markets. 

We can, in the long term, still face the future with confidence but we appreciate that some clients may have understandable short term concerns. 

If you have any questions on this report, or on any aspect of the current situation, please do not hesitate to get in touch with us. 

The Chancellor has, we think, taken sensible and prudent action. As he said, “life can no longer be put on hold” and let us hope that economic activity in the UK – and the wider world – quickly reflects that. 

Proposed changes to IHT for siblings

Wednesday, September 9th, 2020

At the moment, only those who are married or who are registered civil partners are exempt from paying inheritance tax (IHT) on money or property left to them by their spouse. This was expanded to include heterosexual civil partnerships at the end of 2019.

But the law does not cover siblings who are cohabiting.They are liable to pay the standard IHT rate of 40% of anything over the £325,000 threshold.

The injustice this poses for some households was highlighted by the recent case of Catherine and Virigina Utley. They have lived together for over 30 years in the house in Clapham which they both bought. Despite being co-owners, when one of them dies the surviving sister will be forced to sell the property to be able to pay the IHT, estimated at about £140,000. 

Shocked by the unfairness of this situation, Lord Lexden has brought a new Bill to the House of Lords. Under the new proposals, siblings would be exempt from paying IHT on property left to each other, provided they had lived together for at least seven years and that the surviving sibling was over 30. As well as brothers and sisters, the law would also apply to half brothers and sisters and be valid in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

While this would be good news for cohabiting siblings, some people feel the proposed changes do not go far enough. The new law still wouldn’t provide any protection for those who are cohabiting but who are not married or in a civil partnership. Cohabiting couples do not have any rights to their home on the death of their partner. In this respect, the UK is way behind other countries.  

A change to the law for cohabiting siblings in terms of IHT will raise questions as to where the line is drawn. Other platonic couples, such as parents and children, or friends who own a property together, may also want to be considered. The rules will have to be sufficiently tightly defined so as not to be open to abuse.      

If you would like to review your IHT liability, do not hesitate to get in touch with us.

Should over-40s pay more tax to solve the social care crisis?

Thursday, August 13th, 2020

The question of who should pay for social care is a pressing one; successive governments have grappled with the issue and none have found a concrete solution. At the moment, some people who don’t qualify for local council funded care have to sell their homes to cover the costs, which can exceed £1,500 a week. 

Last year, in his first speech as Prime Minister, Johnson outlined the need for a reform of the current system and back in March, the government launched a parliamentary inquiry into the shortage of care available on the NHS. Since then, the large number of coronavirus deaths in care homes across the country has kept the issue firmly in the spotlight.

Ministers in Boris Jonhnson’s health and social care taskforce are currently studying a scheme where everyone over 40 would start contributing towards the cost of care in later life. Over 40s would have to pay more in tax or national insurance, or be obliged to insure themselves against hefty care bills.

Matt Hancock, the Health Secretary, is a keen advocate of the plan and is committed to coming up with a solution.

The system that ministers are considering draws on pre-existing models for funding social care in Japan and Germany. Both systems have drawn admiration as sustainable ways of solving the challenges that an ageing population brings.

Under the German system, everyone starts contributing to the scheme when they start working, and employers match their contributions, similar to workplace pension schemes in the UK. At the moment, 1.5% of each person’s salary, plus a 1.5% employer contribution, are ring fenced for social care in later life.

Elderly Germans can use this money to pay carers to help them at home or use them for care home fees. They can even give them to relatives and friends for helping to look after them. 

The Japanese scheme is similar, but people only start contributing when they are 40.

At the moment, nothing has been confirmed. Officials are still looking into the exact mechanism by which over 40s would pay. However, social care experts have cautioned that an insurance model would have to be compulsory to ensure people paid.

The scheme under consideration has found favour with campaigners. Caroline Abrahams, the charity director at Age UK, said the scheme “may be rather a good deal, since that system offers a level of provision and reassurance that we can only dream of here at the moment.” She added that the scheme would “arguably [be] an appropriate act of national atonement after the catastrophic loss of life we’ve seen in care homes during the pandemic”.

It will be interesting to see how the government eventually decides to finance its scheme. Watch this space.

Problems for the Bank of Mum and Dad

Thursday, July 16th, 2020

With many furloughs coming to an end and an increasing number of redundancies being announced, the Bank of Mum and Dad is being asked to step in on a regular basis to help its adult children with their financial commitments. 

Parents are seeing their children’s debt escalate, which is often primarily due to rent payments. Under coronavirus legislation, private landlords have to give their tenants 3 months’ notice to quit but nevertheless the payment is still due. While homeowners can take a mortgage payment holiday and add the debt to the end of the mortgage, tenants have to repay what they owe much more quickly, even if they have agreed a schedule with their landlords. Housing benefit is often unlikely to cover the full rent. With no source of income on the horizon, grown-up children may resort to requesting a parental bailout.      

One hazard in a shared house can be that one of the occupants may decide to ‘disappear’ if they are very behind with the rent, leaving the other housemates to cover the arrears. This is a particular issue if the parents of one the remaining tenants had agreed to act as rental guarantors at the outset.         

Which leads on to the next stage of helping with house purchases. Many parents are keen to help their offspring to get a foot on the property ladder. According to Legal and General, the average contribution by the Bank of Mum and Dad rose by more than £6,000, to £24,100 in 2019. This put it in the top 10 of UK mortgage lenders, with parents having given £6.3 billion collectively. 

In the current climate, especially with many high Loan to Value (LTV) mortgages being withdrawn, parental input is certainly needed. But when parents may be facing financial difficulties of their own, are they going to be as willing to keep on lending and gifting deposits?

Some parents may decide to hold fire in the hope that more properties may come onto the market and prices may drop dramatically. Others may decide that if it’s been a bit of a shock to the system having a grown-up child suddenly back under their roof under lockdown, helping provide the funds for a quick house purchase may be preferable!    

If you do decide to act as the Bank of Mum and Dad, it’s important to make sure you can afford it. If you’re using your pension and savings to help out, consider what impact that will have on your own retirement. 

It’s also important to make sure it’s clear whether the money is a gift or a loan, as this will have different tax implications. If your child is moving in with a partner, you may want a say in how the rights to the property will be held should the relationship break down at some point.     

Do get in touch if you have any queries regarding the issues involved in being part of this well-known financial lending institution.

How to make the most of a Junior ISA nest egg

Wednesday, April 22nd, 2020

As of 6 April, the amount you can put into a Junior ISA (JISA) per annum has increased to £9,000 – quite a jump from the previous allowance of £4,368.

The tax saving this provides makes it an effective way of building up a nest egg for your children if you want to help with a gap year, university fees, or to enable them to get a foot on the property ladder.  

Which type of JISA?

You can choose to put the money into either a cash JISA or a stocks and shares one. Even in these low-interest rate days, the cash ones can attract quite generous rates with some as high as 3.6%. Another advantage is that they don’t have the volatility associated with the stock market, a particular issue at the current time.          

Yet while the majority of JISAs tend to be in cash, experts state that this can be a wasted opportunity. Despite the recent turmoil, the stock market will usually outperform cash savings over the long term. Wealth manager, Jason Hollands, calculates that if you achieved a 6 per cent annual return – which he describes as ‘quite modest’ – a JISA that had £9,000 invested in it each year would be worth more than £290,000 after 18 years. As you can see, once compound interest kicks in, it can have a considerable effect. He estimates that even JISAs that had smaller sums of £50 or £100 a month invested into them would accumulate pots of £19,367 or £38,735 respectively.

So if you’re wanting to use the JISA as a vehicle for a long-term investment to get your child through a degree course or to help them to buy a property, cash is not the most effective way to do so. 

It’s also advisable to invest a regular amount on a monthly basis amount rather than just put in lump sums at specific times. This avoids the worry of knowing whether it’s the right time to invest and also has the benefit of smoothing out the peaks and troughs in share prices.  

Inheritance Tax Implications

Parents or guardians are the only ones who can actually open a JISA but grandparents can pay money into the account. This can be a productive way of using up their annual gift allowance. They do just need to bear in mind the Inheritance Tax rules, though, especially now the JISA allowance has increased. The annual gift allowance on an Inheritance Tax free basis is £3,000 per donor (with one year’s allowance carried forward). Inheritance Tax would be charged on anything over this limit in the seven years before their death. Gifts of up to £250 per person can be given during the tax year as long as another exemption has not been used on the same person.

Once your child turns 18, the JISA becomes theirs. They can either access it directly or transfer it into an adult ISA. This encourages them to develop a lifelong interest in money and helps build up a great investment discipline. In fact, the Government’s decision to increase the JISA allowance was all part of its aim to create a generation of savers.    

The new JISA allowance could mean that your child comes of age on a much sounder financial footing.  

IR35 – ready, steady…not ready?

Wednesday, March 4th, 2020

The big issue which has been dominating the accounting world in recent months is IR35. Will businesses be ready when the reforms come in on 6th April? 

The overwhelming view expressed by representatives from various accountancy bodies is that they will most certainly not be, not least because legislation is still not finalised.         

IR35 was introduced in 2000 as an anti-tax avoidance rule, aimed at freelancers or contractors who were deemed by HMRC to be, in effect, working as employees. Under the new rules, every medium and large private sector business in the UK will be responsible for determining the tax status of any contractor they use. This has already been the case in the public sector since 2017.

HMRC is adamant that the reforms should go ahead in order to tackle the ‘fundamental unfairness’ surrounding the current non-compliance with the rules, which it believes could cost the Exchequer more than £1.3bn by 2023-24.   

However, the investigation by the House of Lords finance sub committee has revealed that there are still many uncertainties and unanswered questions. Despite the impending start date, the actual implementation rules are still being set out by HMRC. There is also concern that the CEST tool, which checks someone’s employment status, is still not up to the job.

Julia Kermode, chief executive of the Freelancer & Contractor Services Association, commented that there was mounting evidence that clients had been unable to fully prepare in advance of the April 2020 changes. She explained that a number of businesses were only just finding out about their new liabilities as HMRC’s education programme was delayed to do the general election. 

While large employers, who have in-house tax teams, may have been able to make some preparations, smaller businesses are thought to be less ready as they don’t have the expertise to understand the intricacies of the off-payroll reforms. And even if larger companies are in better shape, the view is that no one is truly prepared.

Businesses are disappointed that their calls for the reforms to be postponed have been ignored and feel that the review by the Treasury didn’t go far enough. They feel that the issues experienced by the public sector since 2017, with many contractors simply leaving and working elsewhere, have not been heeded. This has caused major problems with resourcing and recruitment in organisations like the NHS. There is also concern that some large companies will react by simply issuing a blanket ban and not hiring contractors at all. 

Although experts have welcomed the fact that the Treasury has promised a ‘soft landing’ in the first year of the reforms, they have warned that businesses in the private sector shouldn’t be complacent. The ‘light touch’ will still mean that HMRC will impose penalties if there is thought to have been deliberate non-compliance.   

Proposed changes to IHT for siblings?

Thursday, February 6th, 2020

At the moment, only those who are married or who are registered civil partners are exempt from paying inheritance tax (IHT) on money or property left to them by their spouse. This was expanded to include heterosexual civil partnerships at the end of 2019.

But the law does not cover siblings who are cohabiting.They are liable to pay the standard IHT rate of 40% of anything over the £325,000 threshold.

The injustice this poses for some households was highlighted by the recent case of Catherine and Virigina Utley. They have lived together for over 30 years in the house in Clapham which they both bought. Despite being co-owners, when one of them dies the surviving sister will be forced to sell the property to be able to pay the IHT, estimated at about £140,000. 

Shocked by the unfairness of this situation, Lord Lexden has brought a new Bill to the House of Lords. Under the new proposals, siblings would be exempt from paying IHT on property left to each other, provided they had lived together for at least seven years and that the surviving sibling was over 30. As well as brothers and sisters, the law would also apply to half brothers and sisters and be valid in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

While this would be good news for cohabiting siblings, some people feel the proposed changes do not go far enough. The new law still wouldn’t provide any protection for those who are cohabiting but who are not married or in a civil partnership. Cohabiting couples do not have any rights to their home on the death of their partner. In this respect, the UK is way behind other countries.  

A change to the law for cohabiting siblings in terms of IHT will raise questions as to where the line is drawn. Other platonic couples, such as parents and children, or friends who own a property together, may also want to be considered. The rules will have to be sufficiently tightly defined so as not to be open to abuse.      

If you would like to review your IHT liability, do not hesitate to get in touch with us.

The election result and your finances.

Wednesday, January 22nd, 2020

With the Conservative’s having won their largest majority since 1987, we thought now would be a good time to reflect on some of the pledges made during the election campaign. How will the promised reforms affect you and your finances? 

Increase of the National Insurance threshold

The NIC threshold is set to rise from £8,632 to £9,500, which will lead to savings of around £100 a year for the 31 million workers who earn above that amount. Over the long term, the Conservatives have set an ambitious £12,500 threshold which would result in a tax reduction of £500 for those who earn over that figure.  

State pension triple lock

The state pension lock is set to be maintained, which is unsurprising, particularly after Theresa May’s plans to change the system cost her voters back in 2017. Currently, under the triple lock the state pension increases year on year, in line with whichever is the highest of these three measurements: the average earnings increase, the rate of inflation or 2.5%.

Further pension pledges

The government has pledged to address a separate pension anomaly which can result in people earning under £12,500 to be denied pension tax relief, if their provider uses the ‘net pay arrangement’ approach as opposed to the ’relief at source’ method. 

The government has also mentioned that it will address the ‘taper tax’ issue that is causing many senior NHS medical professionals to turn down work and overtime, rather than risk a retrospective pension tax charge. 

Steve Webb, director of policy at Royal London, raises the concern that there is a “lack of detail” in the suggested reforms, mentioning that “the measure proposed is far too narrow and may not even work. The tapered allowance affects far more people than senior NHS clinicians and creates complexity and uncertainty in the tax system.”

More will be revealed, no doubt, when Sajid Javid delivers his budget on 11 March.  

Income tax

When he was battling for leadership of the Conservatives, Boris Johnson promised to reduce Britain’s tax burden, making the bold statement that he would raise the threshold for the 40% higher-rate income tax band from £50,000 to £80,000. This would have resulted in serious tax savings for the top 10% of earners. It appears, however, that the plan has been shelved, at least for now. 

Rest assured, we’ll keep our ears to the ground and will update you of any significant policy changes in the budget that might affect your finances. In the meantime, if you have any queries, please don’t hesitate to get in touch.

Ready for the end of the tax year?

Wednesday, January 15th, 2020

The tax year will end on April 5th. Are you confident that you have made appropriate preparations and maximised your tax allowances?

Here are some of the allowances that you should consider: 

The Marriage Allowance

You can transfer £1,250 of your Personal Allowance to your spouse or civil partner if they earn more than you and pay tax at the basic rate. This could yield a potential tax saving of £250. You need to make sure that you have income within your Personal Allowance of £12,500. An application to HMRC needs to be made for this allowance. It’s also worth noting that you can backdate your claim to include any tax year since April 5th 2015. 

Enterprise Investment Scheme, SEIS and VCT

Investments made with the Enterprise Investment Scheme (EIS) or Seed Enterprise Investment Scheme (SEIS) during the current tax year can be carried back for relief for the 2018/2019 tax year, potentially providing both income tax relief and capital gains tax deferral relief. However, rules differ between the two so be sure to check with each provider. 

For the EIS, you can obtain 30% income tax relief on the amount allocated for shares in EIS qualifying companies, from a minimum of £500 up to a maximum of £2,000,000. For Venture Capital Trusts (VCT), you receive 30% of tax relief on investments up to £200,000. For SEIS qualifying companies, you can receive 50% income tax relief on up to £100,000 per year.  

The Tapered Annual Allowance

For higher income earners, the tapered annual allowance will apply. For every £2 of adjusted income, including employer pension contributions, as well as income over £150,000, your annual allowance is reduced by £1. The Government has a comprehensive guide for working out whether your income will have the allowance applied. You may only be able to assess this accurately as you get closer to April 5th. If you can assess the figures accurately in time to make a pension contribution, then ensure you do so. If not, as soon as the most accurate figures become available, you can take steps to make up any shortfall by carrying it forward to the next year.

The Money Purchase Annual Allowance

You can get tax relief on pension contributions of up to £40,000 per year or 100% of your taxable salary. However, if you have already started drawing income from a defined contribution pension scheme, the amount you can pay into a pension without suffering a tax charge reduces. 

The allowance for the 2019/2020 tax year remains unchanged from last year at £4,000 and applies if you have taken any taxed income from a money purchase or defined contribution pension. This extends to personal pensions, SIPPs and workplace pensions.

Expenses

If you’re an employee, you may be able to claim for expenses not reimbursed by your employer, such as travel mileage (not including home to work), the cost of buying small essential items or equipment needed to do your job, such as tools or professional subscriptions. 

If your employer reimburses you at a rate lower than the current standard mileage rate of 45p per mile for the first 10,000 miles and 25p per mile thereafter, you can claim the difference back in your tax return. 

Taking the time now to make sure you’re maximising your allowances can yield notable tax savings at the end of the tax year on April 5th. If you require any help with your tax planning, don’t hesitate to get in contact with us and we will make sure that you’re on the right track.