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What is the Innovative Finance ISA?

Posts Tagged ‘ISA’

What is the Innovative Finance ISA?

Thursday, February 14th, 2019

Innovative Finance ISAs (IFISA) are a little-known type of ISA that can see great returns. Here’s a summary of what they are and how they use P2P lending to secure steady rates of growth:

P2P lending

P2P lending stands for peer to peer. It’s founded on a pretty straightforward idea: you lend your money to individuals or businesses using a P2P platform as a middleman. Because the interest rates on loans are considerably higher than on savings accounts, they are often an attractive option. With P2P lending, you can expect returns of between 3% and 7% depending on the account you choose.

The IFISA

Three years ago this coming April, the government introduced the IFISA. This allows consumers to invest part or all of their £20,000 ISA allowance in P2P lending. On the surface, the IFISA seems perfect. It’s a tax efficient way of achieving high returns with relatively low volatility.

However, so far the IFISA has been a bit of damp squib.

In the 2017-2018 tax year, £290 million was invested in IFISAs, with an average of £9,355 per person. This might sound like a lot of money, but when you compare it to the £69.3 billion invested in adult ISAs the same year, it pales in comparison.

Industry surveys point the finger at a lack of awareness about the IFISA. Just 6% of Brits are aware of them. Whereas 75% were aware of traditional cash ISAs and 40% knew about stocks and shares ISAs in the same research.

Part of the issue is that P2P platforms have taken a while to bring their IFISAs to the marketplace. Almost three years after their introduction, only 36 IFISA products are available with regulatory delays cited as a reason for this slow uptake by major P2P platforms.

People who are already aware of P2P lending are far more likely to invest in IFSAs. More and more people are investing in IFISAs and it’s thought that much of this growth has been driven by existing P2P investors converting their existing accounts into IFISAs.

Funding care home costs with a care home ISA

Wednesday, September 19th, 2018

If you’re under 60, funding your future care might not be top of your agenda. Garden improvements, good restaurants and holidays probably rank slightly higher, as well as saving for your pension if you’ve not yet retired.

However, the government could be proposing a new ISA in order to encourage people to start saving for their later life care. Recent leaked government documents suggest that the government is considering a Care ISA as part of its forthcoming green paper on social care.

The Care ISA would have a tax free allowance of its own that reflects the cost of care. Any leftover savings from this ring-fenced amount would be safe from inheritance tax when you die.

The high cost of later life care is something that looms for many of us.

Currently, those in England and Northern Ireland who have assets of more than £23,250 will be expected to self-fund their care completely. This can mean selling the family home and spending a chunk of your savings on funding care.

Councils are becoming increasingly ruthless in cracking down on people who deliberately deprive themselves of assets by giving them away. There is no time limit on how far a council can go back when claiming deliberate deprivation.

A Care ISA would mean that, if a saver comes to need later life care, more of their assets would be protected.

However, the Care ISA has been widely criticised by both providers and financial commentators.

At the moment, people can leave £325,000 and, from April 2020, couples with children and property will be able to leave £1 million jointly. Much of the population dies with less assets than these. So, for many people, an inheritance tax break isn’t relevant, which could limit the Care ISA’s uptake, making it unattractive for providers to offer it. They may prefer to take advantage of other products, such as a pension, because they offer immediate tax relief.

Additionally, financial services firm Hargreaves Lansdown suggest that only one in four people ends up paying for long term care costs, making the Care ISA even more unattractive.

This means that providers are unlikely to see the Care ISA as a significant business opportunity. The upfront costs of implementing the niche ISA could make it unprofitable.

What’s more, it is unclear how the government would clamp down on the tax loophole that will emerge if savers pay for their care from funds outside of the Care ISA and use the ISA as an inheritance tax exempt savings fund.

The abundance of negative feedback means that the Care ISA may well remain the stuff of fantasy for the treasury.

The end of LISA?

Thursday, August 16th, 2018

The new girl on the block, in terms of saving products, seems like she may not actually be around for much longer. LISA, or the lifetime ISA, is being threatened with abolition by a Treasury committee, having only been on the market for 16 months.

The LISA allows those aged between 18 and 50 to save up to £4,000 a year towards a pension or a first home tax free, with the promise of a 25% government bonus capped at £1,000 a year.

However, a panel of MPs have highlighted significant drawbacks with the scheme. Some of the negative feedback has centred around the scheme’s complexity and that is confusing to customers.

The LISA has always seemed a somewhat odd product in that it has two very different target audiences; those saving for a house and those saving for a pension. It’s difficult to see how one product could hold the same appeal for both.

In fact, it has worked better as a vehicle for those saving for a deposit on a house than those using it as a pension allowance. After all, what first time buyer wouldn’t want an extra 25% from the government? It hasn’t been as appealing to those looking for a pension replacement.

The main problem is the 25% exit penalty imposed if you withdraw money from the scheme for any purpose other than retiring or buying a house. This is viewed as exceptionally high, especially as many savers do not realise the penalty is 25% of the entire pot. Those who have had to withdraw money earlier, for whatever reason, have lost more money than they expected.

It’s true that demand for the LISA not been strong and there has been relatively little take-up. What’s more, very few advisers have been keen to offer them.

To some extent, though, it seems a shame to talk about scrapping the scheme when it has only really just got started. If you or a family member fall into the age range and do qualify for a LISA, it could be worth investigating one now and make the most of the government bonus before time runs out.

Help To Buy v Lifetime: Which ISA is best?

Wednesday, May 11th, 2016

Set to be introduced in April 2017, the Lifetime ISA essentially offers an alternative to the Help To Buy ISA. With two competing options on the table, it’s important to know which is best for you and your needs, as whilst they have some similarities, there are also key differences between the two.

The Help To Buy ISA allows you to save up to £200 each month to save for a deposit on your first home. The government then boosts your savings further to the tune of 25% up to a total limit of £3,000, as long as you’re a first time buyer purchasing a property priced up to £450,000 in London and up to £250,000 everywhere else in the UK. There is no minimum deposit each month, and you’re also able to pay in £1,000 when the account is opened that doesn’t count towards your monthly savings.

Available up to Autumn 2019, anyone aged sixteen or over is entitled to open a Help To Buy ISA. The accounts are limited to one per person, which means both people in a couple can have an account and benefit from the bonus.

The new Lifetime ISA is based on similar principles but has several important differences, with the most important being that it can be used either to save for purchasing your first home or as money put away as a pension for later in life. There’s no limit on how much you can save each month as long as you don’t go over the yearly cap of £4,000.

Again, the government offers a 25% bonus, but this is paid whether you use the money to purchase your first home up to a price of £450,000 anywhere in the country, or keep it for later in your life. Any money that’s taken out before your 60th birthday and not used for purchasing your first home will forfeit the government bonus plus any growth or interest earned from it, as well as incurring a 5% charge. If you wait until after you’re 60, you can take out everything tax-free.

As you will be allowed to have both a Lifetime ISA and a Help To Buy ISA, you can choose to do this, but you will only be able to use the bonus from one of the two accounts to buy a home. As the Lifetime ISA is essentially replacing the Help To Buy ISA, it makes sense to opt for the newer style of account after they are introduced next April. If you want to set up an ISA for your child, however, you could consider opening a Help To Buy ISA on their 16th birthday then transferring the savings to a Lifetime ISA two years later which will allow you to take full advantage of the government bonuses.