Contact us: 01799 543222

Financial planning in your forties

Archive for the ‘Tax planning’ Category

Financial planning in your forties

Thursday, August 16th, 2018

It’s well known life begins at forty. Doesn’t it?

It should be an exciting decade, full of plans and aspirations. It’s also likely to be a time of optimum earning potential.

What’s more, it’s a crucial decade to take a step back and make sure your finances are on track to meet your goals.

There’ll be some decisions you’ll already have taken in your twenties or thirties, which will have had an impact. You may have bought your own home, for example, or put some savings away in cash, investments or pensions.

If things don’t look quite as rosy as you’d hoped, though, your forties are a good time to take stock, as there’s still time to make adjustments and give your investments time to grow.

Don’t forget, whatever savings you can make now will enable you to pursue your dreams later on.

Here are four key tips for shrewd financial planning at this important time of life.

Budget ruthlessly

Just because life may feel comfortable with regular pay rises and bonuses don’t fall into the temptation of spending more than you need. Do you really need that Costa coffee or M&S lunch every day?

Apps like Money Dashboard or Moneyhub can be helpful in showing you where your money’s going. Simple steps like cancelling subscriptions or switching bill providers can make a significant difference.

Historic studies show that investments usually outperform cash savings so any disposable income you can invest will be beneficial. If you can put money aside in a pension you’ll also be taking advantage of the tax relief available. Make sure you use your ISA allowance too for more accessible funds.

Carry out a protection audit

Think about what if the unexpected happened. Your forties are a time of life where you may find yourself part of what’s known as ‘the sandwich generation’ i.e. caring for elderly parents at the same time as looking after young children. This can put extra pressure on you. Make sure you’re protected should the worst happen by ensuring you have a good emergency fund in place. Also think about critical illness cover and life insurance.

Property plans

Your home will be a fundamental part of your financial planning at this time of life. If you feel you need a larger property, these are likely to be your peak earning years so now is the time to secure the best mortgage you can and find your dream home. On the other hand, if you’re quite happy where you are, it may be a good time to remortgage to get a better deal.

Family spending

Everyone’s situation is different. You may have children at university or you may still be having to pay for nursery fees. Whatever your position, make sure you budget accordingly and allow for inflation, especially if you’re paying private school fees. Work out the priorities for your family – the best education now or a house deposit in the future. It’s important not to derail your own life savings for the sake of your children as no one will benefit in the long run.

By doing some sound financial planning now, you’ll have more hope of continuing in the style you want to live, well beyond your forties.

The end of LISA?

Thursday, August 16th, 2018

The new girl on the block, in terms of saving products, seems like she may not actually be around for much longer. LISA, or the lifetime ISA, is being threatened with abolition by a Treasury committee, having only been on the market for 16 months.

The LISA allows those aged between 18 and 50 to save up to £4,000 a year towards a pension or a first home tax free, with the promise of a 25% government bonus capped at £1,000 a year.

However, a panel of MPs have highlighted significant drawbacks with the scheme. Some of the negative feedback has centred around the scheme’s complexity and that is confusing to customers.

The LISA has always seemed a somewhat odd product in that it has two very different target audiences; those saving for a house and those saving for a pension. It’s difficult to see how one product could hold the same appeal for both.

In fact, it has worked better as a vehicle for those saving for a deposit on a house than those using it as a pension allowance. After all, what first time buyer wouldn’t want an extra 25% from the government? It hasn’t been as appealing to those looking for a pension replacement.

The main problem is the 25% exit penalty imposed if you withdraw money from the scheme for any purpose other than retiring or buying a house. This is viewed as exceptionally high, especially as many savers do not realise the penalty is 25% of the entire pot. Those who have had to withdraw money earlier, for whatever reason, have lost more money than they expected.

It’s true that demand for the LISA not been strong and there has been relatively little take-up. What’s more, very few advisers have been keen to offer them.

To some extent, though, it seems a shame to talk about scrapping the scheme when it has only really just got started. If you or a family member fall into the age range and do qualify for a LISA, it could be worth investigating one now and make the most of the government bonus before time runs out.

How best to help your grandchildren financially

Wednesday, July 25th, 2018

Being a grandparent is an exciting time of life. You get all the enjoyment of doing fun activities with your grandchildren but can hand them back at the end of the day. Part of that pleasure is knowing that you can help them financially. Often you’re at a stage of your life where you’re comfortably off and in a position where you want to give a helping hand to the next generation.

The plus side of this is that you get the opportunity to make a real difference to your grandchildren’s lives. The downside is that the regulations around inheritance tax (IHT) can be confusing and the red tape overwhelming at times. By taking steps to find out what the rules are though, you can make life easier for family members and still be confident that you have enough money for your own retirement dreams.

One important consideration is the timing of your gift. If there’s a new arrival in the family, the financial needs will be very different than if it is to help older children. For example, the priority may be to help the newborn’s family move to a more spacious home or to help with private school fees for a primary school-aged child. Later on, it may be to help with driving lessons, pay for school or university fees or enable them to get on the housing ladder. You may decide you want to leave your money to your grandchildren in your will, in which case it is vital to plan your giving in advance in a tax efficient way.

IHT will be levied on your estate at 40% when you die, so if you’re giving money away now that will have an impact later. The nil-rate band is a threshold of £325,000 for the value of your estate. Anything above that will be taxed. Making monetary gifts can take the money out of the ‘IHT net‘ but remember this only applies for the seven years after you made the gift. It’s worth exploring some extra allowances such as being able to give £3,000 of gifts per tax year (your annual exemption) as well as an allowance for small gifts and wedding/birthday gifts.

There are a number of alternatives to make your gift. If the money is needed before age 18, a trust structure is a tax-efficient way to give money, while still giving you some control on how it is used. A Junior ISA can also be a good option as it grows tax-free, building up a fund for driving lessons or university fees. You can’t open the JISA on your grandchild’s behalf but you can pay into it up to their annual limit, currently £4,260. If they’re older, you might want to consider a lifetime ISA for a housing deposit. Again, you can’t open it for them as a Lifetime ISA can only be opened by someone between the ages of 18-39 but if your grandchild opens one, it’s a way for them to save up to £4,000 a year and get a 25 per cent government bonus on top.

Whatever you opt for, you’ll have the feel-good factor of helping the next generation in a way that is right for both you and them.

Can we make inheritance tax simpler?

Monday, July 16th, 2018

Inheritance tax (IHT) has existed in the UK for over 300 years. In its current form, it was brought in to replace the old Capital Transfer Tax; a measure that was brought in itself as a form of wealth distribution in order to regulate disparity between rich and poor.

Although in concept the idea is quite simple, in reality, the caveats and bureaucracy surrounding it in its present form can make it difficult to get your head around. In fact, this January, Chancellor Philip Hammond called the current system “particularly complex” and appealed to the Office for Tax Simplification (OTS) to hold a review of it. In his communication with them he stated: “I would be most interested to hear any proposals you may have for simplification, to ensure that the system is fit for purpose and makes the experience of those who interact with it as smooth as possible.”

As it stands, in 2018 the IHT allowance remains at £325,000, as it has done since 2010, with no plans to increase it. For those who qualify however, the Residence Nil Rate Band Allowance (RNRB) raises the threshold by £125,000 – this is planned to increase by £25,000 a year for the next two tax years, meaning that in 2020/21 the RNRB will stand at £175,000. The IHT rate itself is firmly at 40% for anything above the £325,000 threshold, however if 10% of an estate is left to charity, the rate is adjusted to 36%. Even with these limited examples, the complexity of the issue is abundantly clear.

The possibility of simplifying IHT is definitely there – it all comes down to the will of the treasury. In fact, in April of 2018, the OTS declared that it would “identify simplification opportunities” and made a request for feedback from those with personal experience of IHT. We can be confident that there will at least be a review of things such as the taxation of trusts, the RNRB allowance and exemptions and reliefs for things such as business and agricultural property.

Simplification could ultimately lead to the system being replaced entirely, but reforms leading to increased taxes would likely prove politically unpopular under the current government. Only time will tell whether or not we see changes in the near future, but the changes are certainly feasible.

What is Making Tax Digital (MTD)?

Monday, July 16th, 2018

HMRC is striving to revolutionise the UK tax system and plans to do that through the Making Tax Digital (MTD) initiative. HMRC wants to be the most efficient tax authority in the world, and embracing the use of digital data appears to be the path towards that. The current system can be scrutinised for not being effective enough, efficient enough or straightforward enough for taxpayers. By bringing in a completely digitalised tax system by 2020, HMRC aims to make those problems a thing of the past whilst also bringing down the overheads involved in managing UK tax affairs.

The changes will effectively bring an end to self-assessment, providing a new experience for a wide range of taxpayers. Most businesses, the self-employed and landlords will be covered by the changes, with the system requiring the majority of business owners to keep a digital record of their accounts and transactions.

Announced for the first time in the Spring 2015 budget, MTD for VAT reporting comes into play starting April 2019. With it comes the introduction of a set of rules for submitting returns with three main requirements. Firstly, digital record keeping will be introduced, meaning that all VAT registered companies will have to store all transactions in electronic form. Secondly, digital links; there will be a digital link between the final numbers and their source data. Thirdly, digital submissions; each and every submission will be made using approved software through HMRC’s new and improved gateway.

It’s important to note that digital quarterly reporting will only be made mandatory for businesses with a turnover above the VAT registration threshold of £85,000. For businesses, including landlords, with a turnover below the threshold, quarterly reporting will remain optional. There are definitely benefits to choosing to keep your records digitally, making them more robust and enabling an efficient transfer of data between clients, agents and HMRC. Agents will also be able to react to live data, meaning they can proactively offer advice.

If you have any questions surrounding this topic, please feel free to get in touch with us directly.

Can a lack of knowledge of tax rules ever save you?

Monday, July 16th, 2018

Staying on top of the latest tax legislation probably isn’t at the top of the to-do list of the majority of UK citizens, and that’s understandable. If you were to miss something though, would you be let off? Or would your ignorance turn out to be not so blissful, after all?

HMRC agrees that a reasonable excuse can stand as a valid defence for an appellant of a tax penalty. However, what falls under the definition of a reasonable excuse? Documents being lost through theft, fire or flood – that’s acceptable. Serious illness or bereavement (at relevant times), check. Computer or electrical faults, you’re covered. If you need to get hold of a document from a third party then HMRC concedes that it’s reasonable to expect a delay, as long as you can prove you requested the document in reasonable time.

However, under most normal circumstances there are things that will not be considered as a reasonable excuse. Pressure of work, difficulty in complying, lack of reminders from HMRC, and yes, ignorance of tax law. Officially, not being aware of the law to which you have failed to comply will not get you out of paying your penalty. There have been isolated cases, however, where the opposite is true.

For example, in April 2015, the way in which UK citizens living abroad filed Capital Gains Tax (CGT) returns on any UK properties they sold, changed. Where before they would report their capital gains on the annual tax return, now they must file a special Non-Resident Capital Gains Tax (NRCGT) return within 30 days of the property’s disposal. Plenty of UK citizens living abroad missed the memo, and appealed their penalties when they discovered the news.

Judges rulings on these cases were inconsistent, but in the McGreevy v HMRC [2017] case, the appellant was successful, with the judge stating that, “it is preposterous to expect that a document on HMRC’s website which is not easy to find for a tax judge makes invalid all possible excuses about not knowing of the NRCGT return deadlines,” also saying that, “only a small coterie of people obsessed by tax” would expect anybody to even consider checking the Autumn Statement. Each appeal will be looked at on a case by case basis, but officially, it’s up to you to stay informed.

What will leaving the Customs Union mean for my business?

Thursday, May 24th, 2018

When we leave the European Union we will also leave the EU customs union. The question we all want to know the answer to is ‘what does that mean for me?’ Well first, let’s have a quick reminder of what the customs union is. In short, it’s an agreement between European member states that there will be no internal tariffs on goods that move between them. Once goods are within the EU, they can also travel freely. This means that administrative and financial barriers to trade within the EU are massively reduced.

So why would we want to leave? The important factor of the customs union in the Brexit debate has been that while you’re in it, you don’t have the freedom to negotiate your own trade deals on goods from other parts of the world. The government insists that such freedom is integral to the success of Brexit.

There are alternative options to a customs union that are being considered, firstly a customs partnership in which the UK collects the EU’s tariffs on goods from other countries on behalf of the EU. If the UK tariffs were lower, and those goods stayed within the UK, then companies would be able to claim back the difference. This would potentially lead to greater bureaucracy and added costs.

Secondly, the idea of a ‘highly streamlined customs arrangement’ has been proposed. The suggestion is that rather than getting rid of checks altogether, they would be minimised. Trusted trader schemes and new technologies would be used to ensure companies make bulk payments for the duties, rather than each time goods cross a border. Of course we also have the issue of Ireland to address. All involved parties have made a firm commitment to keeping an open border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. We’re yet to see a suggestion that offers the perfect solution to this delicate issue.

Leaving the customs union could mean increased border checks and supply chains within industry would be heavily affected. Businesses operating ‘just-in-time’ production, such as those in the automotive industry, have multiple goods coming into the UK from mainland Europe every day. Honda, for example, relies on 350 trucks arriving daily; a 15 minute delay to their factory in Swindon would lead to an estimated cost of £850,000.

We are likely looking at higher tariffs. Switzerland and Norway do experience tariff-free access to the EU from outside the customs union but in return, they allow free movement of works and contribute to the EU budget. With immigration being such a large factor of the Brexit negotiations and the UK looking to restrict the free movement of people, it’s unlikely that we will negotiate a similar agreement.

The financial advantages of saying ‘I do’

Thursday, May 17th, 2018

A marriage or civil partnership can be a beautiful union of minds and hearts, but there’s no reason why it should end there. There can also be financial benefits to being with your partner, and one of these is the Marriage Allowance. In the 2018-19 tax year, the Marriage Allowance lets you transfer up to £1,190 of your Personal Allowance to your partner, meaning a tax reduction of up to £238, as long as you meet a few requirements.

For the couple to benefit, they must be married or in a civil partnership. The lower earner must have an income of £11,850 or less, and the higher earner must sit in the basic rate tax bracket of between £11,850 and £46,350. It’s worth noting that in Scotland, the higher earner’s salary must be less than £43,430 as the thresholds for basic rate payers differ.

Lower earners can transfer their unused tax-free allowances to their spouse, with the higher earning partner receiving a tax credit equal to the amount of Personal Allowance that has been transferred. The good news doesn’t end there either as the Marriage Allowance can be backdated as far as 5th April 2015. This means that, if you are eligible, you could claim 2015-16’s £212 allowance and 2016-17’s allowance of £220 in this tax year, leaving you with some free cash for you and your partner to treat yourselves.

If you’re currently receiving a pension or you live abroad, your application for the Marriage Allowance will not be affected, as long as you receive a Personal Allowance. However, if you or your partner were born before 6 April 1935, applying for the Married Couple’s Allowance might be more beneficial to you (you can’t claim both at once!).

Spring Statement – March 2018 Overview

Wednesday, March 21st, 2018

Introduction

In 2016 Britain voted to leave the EU and new Prime Minister Theresa May invited George Osborne to consider an alternative career and replaced him as Chancellor with Philip Hammond, the MP for Runnymede and Weybridge nicknamed ‘Spreadsheet Phil’ by his Commons colleagues.

Five months later, Hammond stood up to deliver his first Autumn Statement and immediately announced it would be his last. “No other major economy,” he said, “has two financial statements in a year.” Thus the Budget was moved to Autumn and, from 2018, the Spring Budget would become the Spring Statement.

And here we are… Eighteen months on from Mr. Hammond’s first announcement, the UK continues along its road towards Brexit and the Chancellor – who seems secure in his job for now – continues to be a man who will “choose our course and stick to it” (or words to that effect).

The Economic Background

Expectations for the speech were not high among journalists and commentators: ‘Don’t expect Hammond to pull a rabbit – or even a March hare – out of the hat’ was the general consensus.

Nevertheless, the Chancellor would have some good news on public finances to deliver in his speech. Borrowing has reduced significantly and was expected to be around £45bn for this year as opposed to the forecast £50bn, with day-to-day public spending finally in surplus for the first time since 2002/2003. However, the UK’s total national debt currently stands at £1.8 trillion, equal to 86% of the country’s annual economic output.

Would this mean the Chancellor announcing an end to austerity? After all, some local councils are claiming that they are effectively bankrupt and the NHS has seen spending increase by just 1.1% in real terms since 2010. But the Chancellor will not be changing course: speaking on the BBC’s Andrew Marr Show on the Sunday before the Statement, he said: “This (austerity) isn’t about some ideological issue. It’s about making sure we have the capacity to respond to any future shock in the economy.”

This view was backed up by Liz Truss, Chief Secretary to the Treasury, who wrote in The Times, “There will be no red box, no rabbits out of the hat and no tax changes. Our message is simple. Let’s keep on course, keep our economy strong and focus on the opportunities ahead of us. We want to keep taxes low so that the weekly budget goes further.”

With the OECD predicting that the UK economy would grow at the slowest pace of all the G20 countries this year, what could we look forward to in the speech? The rumours suggested there would be more details of taxing the tech giants such as Facebook and Google, consultations on taxing and discouraging the sale of single-use plastics and even the possibility of a tax on chewing gum to pay for cleaning up the mess it makes.

The Speech

As is now traditional, the Chancellor began his speech with a joke at the expense of Labour Shadow Chancellor, John McDonnell. “I won’t be producing a red book, Mr. Speaker,” he said. “But I can’t speak for the Shadow Chancellor,” – a reference to McDonnell brandishing ‘The Thoughts of Chairman Mao’ in the Commons chamber.

Even more traditionally, he spent the next few minutes outlining what had gone right as the Government, “made solid progress building an economy that works for everyone.” But eventually, the chamber ‘rapport’ was put aside and Philip Hammond turned to what he does best: reading out lists of figures…

The Numbers

The Chancellor began with the forecast growth figures for the UK economy, which the Office for Budget Responsibility (OBR) has increased for this year, now forecasting growth of 1.5% in 2018. That will be followed by growth of 1.3% in 2019 and 2020, then 1.4% in 2021 and 1.5% in 2022. These forecasts are up in the short term and down in the long term, presumably reflecting some uncertainty over the impact of Brexit.

Employment and Inflation

The Chancellor pointed out that the number in work had increased by 3 million since 2010, the equivalent of 1,000 people finding work every day. The unemployment rate is close to a 40 year low and the OBR is predicting that there will be 500,000 more people in work by 2022.

Equally importantly, it is expected that inflation will start to fall over the next 12 months, “closer to the target rate of 2%” which should see most working people start to enjoy real growth in their wages again.

Public Finances

“Borrowing has fallen by three-quarters since 2010,” said the Chancellor and – as we noted in the introduction – this means that the amount the Government spends on servicing the national debt has reduced significantly. The UK now borrows £1 in every £18 it spends, compared to £1 in every £4 in 2010. The Chancellor also confirmed that debt as a percentage of Gross Domestic Product will also fall, from 85.6% of GDP in 2017/2018 to 78.3% in 2021/22.

He confirmed that borrowing would be £45.2bn for this year, £4.7bn lower than had been forecast in the Autumn Budget. “And,” he announced proudly, “£108bn lower than in 2010.” Borrowing would be 2.2% of GDP this year and would gradually fall to 0.9% in 2022/2023.

Progress since the Autumn Budget of 2017

Despite it only being five months since the Autumn Budget, the Chancellor was keen to summarise a list of achievements. There was nothing new in this section: rather it was a re-statement of the commitments made in the Autumn and a confirmation – at least in the Chancellor’s eyes – that the country is on track.

The Autumn Budget contained a pledge to increase the supply of homes to 300,000 a year by the mid-2020s, via an investment programme of £44bn over 5 years and the Chancellor confirmed that the Government was working with 44 areas throughout the UK to bring this about. In addition, London will receive a further £1.67bn to start building 27,000 affordable homes by 2021/22 and the Housing Growth Partnership, which provides additional finance for small builders, was more than doubled to £220 million.

To loud cheers from the backbenches behind him, Philip Hammond announced that an estimated 60,000 first time buyers had already benefited from the abolition of stamp duty announced in the Autumn Budget.

To some muted jeers, though – quite possibly from some of his own Eurosceptic backbenchers – the Chancellor said that “substantial progress” had been made in the Brexit talks. He looked forward to “another step forward” at the forthcoming EU summit and confirmed that the Treasury would be publishing information about how the initial £1.5bn of the £3bn set aside for Brexit planning would be allocated to Government departments.

Wages and Taxation

In the lead up to the speech, the Chancellor had worked hard to set expectations that there would be little by way of new tax or policy announcements. As it turned out, the Chancellor did mention some previously announced changes, but he was also true to his word when it came to brand new announcements or significant new initiatives.

What The National Living Wage will rise to £7.83 per hour
When From April 2018
Comment All the other minimum rates will rise in line with the increase in the headline rate, with the youth rate seeing the largest increase for 10 years. In total, around 2 million people are expected to benefit from the increases.
What The tax free personal allowance will increase to £11,850
When From April 2018
Comment This will mean that a typical taxpayer will be paying £1,075 less income tax than in 2010/11. The threshold for higher rate tax will also increase to £46,350 from April (or £43,431 in Scotland).

Business

What The next revaluation of business rates will be brought forward
When Moved forward to 2021, instead of next being revisited in 2022
Comment This will be welcomed by businesses, especially those in retail and catering/hospitality which have been hit hard by the high level of business rates. Revaluations will also now take place three yearly rather than five yearly, meaning that there will now be reviews in 2021 and 2024.

Other business measures

In the Autumn Budget, £1.7bn was announced for measures to improve transport in English cities. Half of this was given to cities with mayors, but bids are now being invited from other cities across the UK for the remaining £840m.

Hand in hand with this went the Government’s commitment to improve digital connectivity across the UK. In total, £190m was allocated to this and we will now see the first wave of funding, with £95m allocated to 13 areas across the UK.

There will also be £50m made available to help employers prepare for the new T-levels, the technical qualification the Government is introducing.

The Chancellor also discussed three consultations that may impact businesses, though the detail behind these was missing from the summary published on the government website.

Productivity

A long-standing topic in the Chancellor’s speeches (and his predecessor’s), productivity made it on to the formal agenda again, with the Chancellor promising “to understand how best we can help the UK’s least productive businesses to learn from, and catch up with, the most productive.”

Late payments

The Chancellor also promised, if not action, then at least the promise of action, on what he called “the continuing scourge of late payments”. Small businesses everywhere will doubtless be very keen to see what the Chancellor comes up with on this topic.

“Human capital”

A slightly odd choice of phrase, but the Chancellor surmised that the government and business currently know more about measuring the value of investing in infrastructure than they do about measuring investments in “human capital”. For this reason, he said, he had “asked the ONS to work with us on developing a more sophisticated measure.”

There was then a further consultation announced via the treasury website on the same day as the Chancellor’s speech, though Mr Hammond did not refer to it directly.

Enterprise Investment Scheme

Aimed at the current range of venture capital schemes (including the Enterprise Investment Scheme, Seed Enterprise Investment Scheme and Venture Capital Trusts), this consultation is ultimately aimed at attracting more investment into innovative firms. The consultation is considering “additional incentives to attract investment” but, as with many other announcements from the Spring Statement, we will have to wait to see whether that promise comes to fruition.

What might we see in the future?

The pundits had speculated that the Chancellor would only speak for 20 minutes or so. 20 minutes came and went and MPs who had planned on a decent lunch started looking nervously at their watches. But in some senses, this last section of the speech was the most interesting, as it gave a clear indication of the measures we might see in future Budgets, depending on the outcome of various consultations.

The plastic tax

This has been widely trailed – it is also referred to as the ‘litter levy’ – and the Government will use the tax system to ‘encourage the responsible use of plastic throughout the supply chain.’ This will include items such as coffee cups, plastic cutlery and foam takeaway trays. The Chancellor did not mention chewing gum specifically but the rumours are that it will also be included in the measures. “Some of the money raised from any tax changes,” for which you can read, ‘there will be tax changes’ – will be used to encourage the creation of newer, greener products, while £20m will also be given to businesses and universities to fund research into ways of reducing the impact of plastic on the environment.

Taxing the tech giants

What would a Budget speech – or a Spring Statement – be without an attack on the tech giants who are “not paying their fair share of tax?” The Government will once again be considering ways in which to tighten up on Facebook, Amazon, Google and friends: looking 10 years down the line it may also need to consider the impact of the Chinese tech giants such as Alibaba, Tencent and JD.com.

White van man goes green?

At the moment there is tax relief given for agricultural diesel but the Chancellor said he would “call for evidence” on whether this is contributing to air pollution. And in the days when every delivery from Amazon arrives in a white van, he announced that he would consult on tax cuts for low-emissions vans.

Giving people the skills they need

Clearly, improving skills benefits not just the individuals concerned but the wider UK economy, and the Chancellor gave a clear hint that he will offer tax relief to both employees and the self-employed who fund their own training.

Goodbye to cash?

Far more of us now use digital payments rather than cash – although the UK has some way to go to catch up with some countries (such as Sweden) where cash has all but disappeared. The Chancellor is ‘seeking views’ on encouraging business who want to use digital payments. And why wouldn’t he? Digital payments can be tracked and taxed and would represent a way to strike back at the black economy.

Conclusion

The Chancellor’s final point may have read as something of a warning to those up and down the country who currently deal heavily in cash (think hairdressers and window cleaners), but he was determined to finish on a high for all, repeating a message that his party has long promoted. He was keeping the UK on course to be, “an outward-looking, free-trading nation, confident that its best days lie ahead.”

The detail of exactly how he plans to make that happen, though, may well have to wait until the Autumn Budget, where many of the Chancellor’s plans will be made clearer.
For now, however, the new, slimmed down Spring Statement acted as a useful summary of our current economic outlook and an interesting trailer of both things to come and plans being made.

Four things to look out for in the new tax year

Wednesday, March 21st, 2018

With a new tax year come changes to tax and benefits. But just as it’s important to know what changes are being made, it’s equally, if not more important, to actually understand how the change affect you or your business, or if it even has an impact on you at all. Here are four of the key changes to look out for at the start of the 2018/19 tax year and how to work out whether or not you need to do anything.

  1. Employer pension contributions – It’s likely that you’ll have heard about the increase for employer pension contributions through auto-enrolment, but you might not be so clear on exactly what your business will have to do to meet the new minimum contribution. If, in April 2018, an employer already contributes the minimum 2% or more, and the total contribution of both the employer and the employee is 5% or more, the employer doesn’t need to change anything. If the employer or total contribution is under the respective figure, an increase will be needed. It’s also worth remembering that from April 2019, the minimum employer contribution goes up to 3% and the total contribution to 8%.
  2. Salary sacrifice and P11D – Whilst the law still states that a P11D needs to be provided for certain benefits provided under an optional remuneration arrangement, usually known as a salary sacrifice, HMRC has conceded that this won’t be the case for particular instances. This is due to PAYE regulations not being updated to accommodate the ‘relevant amount’ which is the new taxable value. In such cases, as long as the correct relevant amount has been payrolled by the employer, a P11D won’t be needed for 2017/18.
  3. National minimum wage increase – The increase applies to the first pay period beginning on or after 1st April 2018. If the change falls in the middle of an employee’s pay period, it’s not necessary to adjust the old and new national minimum wage rates; the increased wage should simply be implemented for the first pay period after 1st April.
  4. Childcare vouchers – it was proposed that new entrants would not be admitted to employer-provided childcare voucher schemes from 6th April 2018. Following a Commons debate, the deadline has been extended to October 2018.although this still means it is one to watch out for in the 2018/2019 tax year.