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The pros and cons of downsizing

Archive for September, 2017

The pros and cons of downsizing

Wednesday, September 13th, 2017

If your family has grown up and flown the nest and you’re moving closer to retiring, it’s likely that you’ve at least thought about downsizing your home. For some it can be for practical reasons, for others it might be a desire to be closer to their children if they’ve relocated, for others still it might simply be the desire for a change of scenery as they move into the next chapter of their life. But there are pros and cons to downsizing which need to be considered before you make what is always going to be a fairly major personal and financial decision.

The potential benefits of downsizing can be numerous. Living in a smaller home means you’re likely to save money on energy bills, house insurance, council tax and many other costs, allowing you to spend more of your pension income on enjoying life after work. It can also make looking after your home much easier so that you’re spending less time and effort on cleaning, maintenance and repairs as you get older.

In the current economic climate, many older people are choosing to downsize in order to free up funds. For some, this might be with the aim of boosting their own nest egg; for an increasing number of others, this is done in order to help their children get on the property ladder themselves. A loan or gift from the Bank of Mum and Dad has to be funded somehow, and if much of your capital is tied up in your home, downsizing often seems like a good way of obtaining the funds needed for a deposit on a first home.

However, just as the housing market is making it increasingly difficult for first-time buyers to secure a home, it’s also making it more and more challenging for those who want to downsize to be able to do so. Many who want somewhere smaller to make maintaining their property easier are finding that the cost of moving simply means staying put and paying for a cleaner or handyman is the more sensible option. For others, the shortage of houses means that finding a smaller property which suits their needs whilst providing the financial benefits is simply too tall an order in 2017.

So, whilst there are definite potential benefits of downsizing which can potentially help you and your family as you reach your retirement, it’s also worth remembering that those positives are not guaranteed. Moving house is both a major financial and emotional consideration at any point in your life, so make sure you have considered exactly what you will get out of downsizing before making the decision to do so.

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Do you know how much your pension is worth?

Wednesday, September 13th, 2017

Recent research from Royal London has found that around five million people in the UK have ‘forgotten’ pension pots from final salary schemes of former employers. What’s more, many of these deferred members of defined benefit funds don’t know how much a lump sum payout of this accumulated pension would be worth, thanks to a lack of communication from the provider of their old scheme. As people who transfer their pension pot are offered an average lump sum of between £158,000 and £190,000 – around 25-30 times the annual value of their pension – the collective amount held in these forgotten pots could reach a total of up to £800 billion.

As many people are unaware that they are holding valuable pension assets, potentially worth a six figure sum, the researchers emphasise that those who are members of these schemes should take steps to discover how much their pensions are worth, as well as seeking impartial advice on what to do with the money. Whilst taking a lump sum may seem attractive, it may not be the best option for many people, as doing so means sacrificing a guaranteed pension payment.

Nonetheless, more and more people are choosing to make use of pension freedoms in order to take lump sum payments from their retirement savings. The former pensions minister, Baroness Altmann, has suggested that whilst granting the freedoms was the right thing to do, the government should make consultation with the official financial advice service, Pension Wise, compulsory for those looking to take a lump sum. Doing so would ensure “people get financial advice before they make a decision that is irreversible”.

Making any big decisions about your pension can of course have significant ramifications for your future retirement, so if you are considering whether or not to take advantage of pension freedoms yourself, make sure you seek professional advice before doing anything. If you have any questions around this topic, please feel free to get in touch with us directly.

Kids off to Uni? But have you been saving enough?

Wednesday, September 6th, 2017

Recent figures from the Institute of Fiscal Studies suggest that the average total debt incurred by today’s university students over the duration of their studies amounts to £51,000. The new figure comes as those in higher education see the interest rate on student loans rise to 6.1% in September, despite the Bank of England base rate remaining at its lowest ever figure of just 0.25%. The rise means that students will now typically have mounted up £5,800 of interest by the time they graduate. Total student debt in the UK has now risen to £100 billion, a figure higher than the nation’s total credit card debt.

The rising cost of higher education perhaps makes it unsurprising that 40% of parents are now beginning to save towards future university costs before their children have even been born, with one in five hoping to have saved £2,000 by the time the baby arrives. Frustratingly, however, around two thirds of those who are saving are doing so by simply placing the funds in an ordinary savings account, meaning their money is earning them very little in interest.

An alternative option to consider is a Junior ISA (JISA) in the child’s name, which they can then access when they turn 18. The account currently allows £4,128 to be saved every year, and the best rate market rate for a cash JISA offers 3.25%. Saving the maximum amount at that rate for ten years would result in a nest egg of £49,427 tax free to cover university fees with plenty left over for other expenses.

Whilst a cash JISA offers dependability, a stocks and shares JISA is also worth considering as the potential reward on your investment can be higher. Both types of JISA can be opened at the same time with the allowance shared between them, so spreading your savings between the two can pay off in the long run.

Using your pension to save towards your child’s university education is also an option, thanks to the pension freedoms of recent years. With the ability to take a lump sum to put towards fees and other costs when you turn 55, pensions offer a tax-efficient way of putting away for both your child’s future and your own. This is an option which needs careful planning, however, as you’ll need to make sure you have enough for your retirement before paying for your child’s education.

For those able to do so, it may also be worth speaking to your own parents about helping towards their grandchildren’s university costs. Rather than leaving money to a grandchild in their will, a grandparent might consider gifting towards fees and other expenses or placing the money in a trust, reducing their inheritance tax liability and allowing their grandchild to benefit from their legacy when they really need it.

£94bn lost by holding money as cash

Wednesday, September 6th, 2017

A new report has revealed that the UK’s working adult population has missed out on a staggering £94 billion over the past five years through failing to invest in the stock market and holding their money in savings accounts. The figure comes from public policy think tank, The Social Market Foundation, which has also found that more than £200 billion worth of cash is being held by savers above the recommended three months’ worth of income or ‘rainy day’ level of savings that should be kept available.

The think tank has urged the government to do more to inform and encourage savers about diversifying their savings and investments, as the figures suggest many are devaluing the money they’ve worked hard to put away, thanks to high inflation and low interest rates. More worryingly, the report reveals that more than 14 million working adults in the UK are not saving whatsoever and that more than 26 million have inadequate pension savings.

Had UK savers invested in peer-to-peer loans instead of the stock market or simply left the money sitting in a savings account, the returns they would have seen could have amounted to £40 billion. As such, the report recommends the government markets up to 25% of both its Future Britain Funds and National Productivity Investment Funds to the public. This would not only give savers the opportunity to grow their savings, but would also allow them to invest in the country’s future. This could lead to investment of at least £30 billion in these ‘Britannia bonds’ in the next five years, which would provide greater funding for infrastructure.

Another recommendation from the report suggests that the government give £1,500 to every 15-year-old from 2020, funded by money saved by reducing the ISA allowance. With the help of real life financial education, the teenagers would then use the money to invest in a range of asset classes. This would not only help young people to learn the benefits of wise saving and investment practices, but would also ensure they have at least some financial assets as they head towards life outside secondary education.